In 2021, some camps are organising camp experiences for you to participate in. We are hopeful that they will be able to go ahead. Camps will follow the local conditions closely, and may have to cancel activities if the local COVID-19 situation forces them to do so. If you have already signed up for a camp-activity you will be informed when this happens. We will update the website also, when such decisions are taken. Please check your own local authority travel advisory to see if you can travel to or return from the camp after the activity. At all times, when at camps, please observe it’s COVID-19 policy (such as wearing masks, social distancing, washing hands, etc). 

Gift a Membership this Giving Season

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PURCHASE YOUR GIFT IN 3 EASY STEPS

Step 1


Choose your Tree!

View the options below, then select from the dropdown box in Step 2.

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JABOTICABATREE (2)
Hornbeam
Macadamia
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Purchase your Gift Membership

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Global donors

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US donors

Check your Inbox

We’ll send you an email confirming the receipt of your gift purchase, and a second email that includes a digital postcard you can share with the gift recipient, with details of their special Gift Membership and the fruit tree you’ve selected to be planted at a camp in their honour (for purchases until December 24). The recipient will receive an email from us on 6 January, reconfirming this special gift from you and welcoming them to our movement!

WHAT WILL YOUR GIFT MEMBERSHIP ENABLE?

Funding the opening of new Ecosystem Restoration Camps

Strengthening our organisational capacity so that we can support our camps and add new ones

Buying seeds, seedlings and soil enrichers for existing camps to restore their ecosystems

Providing a hands-on restoration camp experience for thousands of people from all walks of life

Buying tools and equipment to plant and create water catching and holding earth structures

Creating a platform for camps and local communities to communicate and learn from one another

HERE'S WHY WE'VE CHOSEN TO PLANT THESE TREES

Camp Desperto, Brazil

Jaboticaba Tree

“Jaboticaba (Plinia cauliflora) is a delicious fruit tree native to Brazil that is ideal for food forests. The fruit offers a good source of minerals such as calcium, iron, potassium and phosphorus, as well as amino acids.”

Michel Bottan, Camp Manager

Camp Virsoleil, France

"Truffle" Trees

“We are planting White Oak, Green Oak, and Hornbeam inoculated with tuber melansporum. They are a native species which produce Perigord Black Truffles, which will contribute a high value and tasty crop to our vision of a self sustaining poly culture farm.”

Claudia Chapel, Camp Manager

Camp Mainsprings, Tanzania

Macadamia Tree

“This is an extremely adaptable tree, able to optimize its water use in a changing climate and sequester a large amount of carbon from the atmosphere, while producing an extremely healthy nut with countless uses.” 

Chris Gates, Camp Manager

Camp Khetee, India

Mango Tree

“These trees produce fruit and fuelwood, which will help us diversify our product line, rebuild community livelihoods and help us to fund restoration work. We will be planting one of the native varieties, planted by our ancestors.” 

Kumar Neeraj, Camp Manager

 

Camp Uthai Forest, Thailand

Pomelo Tree

“The pomelo (Citrus grandis) is native to Thailand and especially the provinces of Uthai Thani and neighboring areas. It can survive well in our conditions  – largely hot, quite dry with in poor soil. We will be able to sell this a high-value fruit in several years, generating income to make Uthai Forest self-sufficient.” 

Hui Ran Toh, Camp Manager

 

Camp Pachaland, Belgium
Wellington Mulberry Tree

“These trees have a large and strong root system which will help stabilize our soil. They produce heavy loads of delicious fruit considered a “super-food” that provides protein and antioxidants, and we’ll use its leaves to make a regenerative tea. Mulberry tea inhibits the digestion of sugar – a benefit for diabetics. While not native,  they integrate well into the local ecosystem without being invasive or impacting other native plants or the soil, & attract birdlife.”

Seb d’Ursel, Camp Manager

Camp Mombasa Mangroves, Kenya

Hass Avocado Tree

“This tree’s deep vertical roots will help prevent erosion on south facing hillside of our rehabilitation area in Tudor Creek in Mombasa. The high in demand avocado fruit will help us diversify our product line which will contribute to our community’s livelihoods and also help us fund our restoration work.” 

Mbaarak Abdalla, Camp Manager

Camp Hotlum, USA

Sugar Pine Tree

“We’ll be planting Sugar pines (Pinus lambertiana) for their many benefits, which include:
* Bringing back native species, rebalancing species diversity and providing traditional habitat for animals and humans.
Providing food, shelter and habitat for local wildlife.
* Excellent traditional food source for humans utilizing seeds, sap, bark & needles.
Important medicinal value
Thick, fire resistant bark, helping improve fire safety”

Jonathan Kabat & Lauren Bond, Camp Managers
Camp Mama Adama, Portugal

Moringa Tree

“This tree is easy to grow and contains many healthy compounds such as vitamin A vitamin B1 (thiamine) B2 (riboflavin) B3 (niacin), B-6 folate, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), calcium, potassium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus and zinc. Moringa is also believed to prevent and cure diseases, is extremely low in fat and contains no harmful cholesterol. Harvesting the many benefits will enable us to help many others in their path in life.”

Yariv Paz, Camp Manager

Camp Habiba, Egypt

Medjool Date Palms

“We would like to plant more Medjool date palms because of the high value of this tree. Apart from the fruit, we also use the wood from the palm tree to build furniture, and the palm fronts are used for roofs in the local community.”

Karim Maged, Camp Manager

Camp Dryland Solutions, Somalia

Arabic Gum Tree

“This tree’s roots are widespread and deep in the ground, helping to prevent soil erosion and making it drought resilient. The tree produces lots of nectar which attracts and feeds pollinators. The nectar is also a source of a natural additive (E414) in high demand in the food and beverage industry worldwide. Harvesting this will increase our product line which improves local community livelihoods, and will help fund restoration work in the future.”

Yasmin Mohamud, Camp Manager

Thank you for supporting this mighty movement to regreen our planet.

Contact us:

info@ecosystemrestorationcamps.org

Stichting Ecosystem Restoration Foundation /
Ecosystem Restoration Camps 2020

Wechelerweg 37
7431 PD Diepenveen
The Netherlands

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